Opening Keynote
Mark Brand
A celebrated restaurateur and retailer, Mark Brand is best known for resurrecting the Save on Meats enterprise in Vancouver’s downtown eastside.

After opening his first restaurant, Boneta, in 2007, Brand went on to open an independent clothing label and storefront called “Sharks + Hammers,” followed by The Diamond tapas restaurant and lounge, Seamonstr Sushi, his Catalog Art Gallery, and lastly―his largest undertaking to date―Save on Meats.

Save on Meats had been a Vancouver landmark from the time it was originally founded in 1957, serving the local community with a butcher shop and lunch counter. Brand resurrected it, restoring the building back to its prime while becoming a leader in the charge to make his vision of a social business model independently sustainable, and at the same time support the local community.

Money generated from Save on Meats’ operations go directly towards supporting people in need. The store employs over 65 workers, many of whom live in the community and struggle with employment barriers, and boasts a meal program that serves 450 people per day, seven days a week.

Closing Keynote
Ryan Knighton
Ryan Knighton is most recently the author of C’mon Papa: Dispatches from a Dad in the Dark. When you strap a baby to her blind father and send them strolling into traffic, the only good to come of it is a funny and moving book about family, fatherhood and survival.

Knighton is also the author of Cockeyed, his internationally acclaimed memoir about going blind, growing up, and getting both wrong. A tragic tale? Enough to have been short listed for the Stephen Leacock medal for Humour, and to have been called one of the year's hottest reads by People magazine. A movie is in the works. Knighton was awarded a fellowship to the highly competitive Sundance Screenwriter's Lab. There he developed the screenplay of his memoir. Yes, a blind man writing movies. The medium's end is near. His adaptation of Cockeyed is currently in development as a motion picture with Jodie Foster directing. A feature documentary about Knighton was released in 2008 called As Slow As Possible. The film chronicles his participation in the longest, slowest song ever performed. It even features a talking bear. Check out www.as-slow-as-possible.com.

Knighton has also written numerous comic essays for Esquire, The New York Times, Salon.com, The Globe and Mail, The Walrus, Saturday Night, Canadian Living, The Believer, The Sunday Telegraph, and The Utne Reader, among many others. His journalism has earned him a National Magazine Award nomination, and often brings him to the CBC microphones as a commentator on many subjects. He continues to write stories and screenplays in Vancouver, where he lives with his wife, daughter and pug. His next book, Nothing To See Here: Around the World in Four Senses, will collect his travel misadventures, and will educate his remaining sensorium. Every year he adds another tattoo to his collection and hopes it comes close to what he imagines. He teaches stuff at Capilano University and is a popular speaker on the university and corporate circuits. Or so they tell him.

Program

Tuesday, June 2nd

1:30 pm - 4:30 pm
Discussion Forums
Embedding Best Practices in Employment Services
Speakers: Annette Borrows , Shelley Gerber

In January CASE launched a website that hosts the multifaceted aspects of supported employment's 9 guiding principles of best practice. Upon this release, Community Living BC adopted the principles. This has significant implications for CLBC and for the service providers.  For CLBC,this included changes to procurement processes, contracting processes and also monitoring. Adopting the principles of best practice is one of the ways that CLBC is moving forward with the Community Action Employment Plan (released in March 2013) which is a multi-stakeholder initiative to mobilize and inspire collaborative employment action across BC. 
 
CLBC has overhauled internal processes to align with best practice. A significant aspect of this process is building the competency of service providers through training and mentoring. CLBC has been seeding training funds into all regions of the province to support the best practices that will result in employment for people with disabilities

Business Community Engagement - Branding and Social Media
Speakers: Hayley Richards , Sean McEwen

What are your organizational messages? Are they on target to help you achieve your goals and outcomes? Are you even 'speaking' to the right audience? Branding experts Sean McEwen and Hayley Richards will present their insights into brand development and social media strategies as vehicles to increase outcomes and community engagement. 
 
Facilitators will walk participants through brand development, implementation, and social media strategy creation utilizing and sharing their own organizational branding journey. This session will combine lecture, group interaction, and guided examples of multimedia platforms. Take away tools and resources will be provided for participants to ignite engagement in their own communities.

Who owns the business? I do!
Through a presentation on the complexities of supported employment at the Canadian Down Syndrome Society and the story of Brandon Thielen’s own personal journey to meaningful employment, delegates learn the importance of developing and aligninga job to a person’s interests, strengths, and abilities from the perspective of a person with Down syndrome. This session will demonstrate how that when appropriate supports are in place, self-advocates can thrive and make important contributions and show that by putting people first, opportunities can unite and strengthen organizations and have positive impact on both operational culture and in the
communities they serve.
 

4:30 pm - 6:30 pm
Conference Opening Reception

Wednesday, June 3rd

9:00 am - 10:30 am
Opening Ceremonies & Keynote Address - Mark Brand
10:30 am - 11:00 am
Networking Break
11:00 am - 12:30 pm
Breakout Sessions
Ready, Willing, and Able: Tapping the potential of persons with intellectual disabilities and ASD for an inclusive and effective labour market
Speakers: Tara Brinston

With an employment rate of only about 25%, Canadians with intellectual disabilities and autism spectrum disorder form a significant untapped labour pool. And yet, with effective support and employer leadership, we know people can join the workforce at rates similar to their peers. Ready, Willing & Able is an innovative delivery model designed to increase employer capacity and demand to hire people with intellectual disabilities and ASD. Working in 20 communities across the country, RWA is transforming the expectations and understanding held by employers about hiring persons with intellectual disabilities and ASD, creating job opportunities at the local level and aligning community capacity to respond to new employer demand by working with the employment supports delivery system to be the effective bridge-builders employers need. 
 
This workshop will share RWA's innovative design model with participants as well as success stories and lessons learned in the 1st year of the initiative.

AURORA: Creating Inclusive and Supportive Work Environments
Speakers: Emma Stinson, Stephanie Hammond

LDAY created the AURORA program to increase awareness of the diversity of learners and provide strategies for supportive, inclusive workplaces. It is comprised of six activity-based modules: Acquisition, Understanding, Retention, Organization, Relationships and Application. This workshop will lead participants through one module to explore their learning preferences and discuss, reflect and question how these impact relationships with co-workers and family. We will also discuss the implementation of the AURORA program in the Yukon and it's success in creating inclusive and supportive workplaces.

A New Architecture for Labour Market Policies for Canadians with Disabilities
Speakers: Michael J. Prince

A lecture format is envisaged, though I would be willing to participate on a panel format if there other speakers with similar topics and interests on public policy matters pertaining to the employment of people with disabilities.

LEAP (Leading Employment & Achieving Possibilities) Youth Employment & Mentorship Project
Speakers: Annette Borrows

Leading Employment & Achieving Possibilities (LEAP) is a unique employment project that serves youth with a disability (ages 16-19) in partnership with the school district, employers, parents, peer mentors and employment specialists to secure paid employment for the youth while still in high school. Peer mentors are trained and matched 1-1 to enhance the ability of the youth they support to prepare, obtain and maintain paid employment in the community. Come hear about the success stories and challenges in bridging the gap from high school to employment.

12:30 pm - 1:30 pm
Lunch Break
1:30 pm - 3:00 pm
Breakout Sessions
CanWork - A CanAssist App for Supported Employment
Speakers: Leo Spalteholz

CanAssist at the University of Victoria is a non-profit organization that develops assistive technology and devices to support people with disabilities.   This workshop will give a brief overview of CanAssist services and projects, and then explore in depth the free CanWork app to support individuals with task completion and scheduling in employment contexts.   CanWork supports individuals in keeping track of their shifts, preparing for shifts, and during shifts (what, when, and how do I finish my tasks?).  
 
Attendees will get an overview of the capabilities and requirements of the CanWork app, and how to apply it in work settings for their clients.   There will be devices available for a chance to get hands-on and explore how the app can support clients in various workplace tasks.

Evidence Based approaches to Employment Programming for individuals with Mental Health Conditions
Speakers: Norm Magnusson

The workshop will combine an oral presentation, PowerPoint,handouts and discussion based on the experience of Sair Training and Employment Placement Services(Steps)a Winnipeg based Employment and Training Centre, serving participants who have been diagnosed with a mental illness. Steps has been serving those with mental health issues for over 50 years. Three years ago, the agency implemented a participant data collection system that can be used as an ongoing evaluative tool, providing indicators of strengths and opportunities for improvement with regard to program delivery.  
 
This workshop will provide:
 
An overview of the decision making process involved in developing a cost effective data collections system.
 
Samples of the data collection forms.
 
Significant findings since the data collection and evaluation process was implemented. 
 
Examples of how the organization's management and Board plan to use the findings to shape future programming consistent with the agencies objectives.

BRIDGE: The Road to Youth Employment
Speakers: Julie Unger

Participants will be introduced to an employment service model that specializes in supporting transitioning youth aged 18-24. Participants will learn about successful philosophies and approach for this specific group, while reviewing actual tools used in the service development and delivery. All attendees will receive a road map to Youth employment & transitions supports; including pre-employment curriculum outline, goal setting strategies, and correlated or confounding issues that may be unique to the is stage of life and employment. Participants will learn some of the differences to be prepared for when specializing in supported employment with youth in transition. Presenters will share successful funding routes, as well as approaches to program development. and future development plans for maximizing natural supports and social capital.

AURORA: Creating Inclusive and Supportive Work Environments - Continued
Speakers: Emma Stinson, Stephanie Hammond

LDAY created the AURORA program to increase awareness of the diversity of learners and provide strategies for supportive, inclusive workplaces. It is comprised of six activity-based modules: Acquisition, Understanding, Retention, Organization, Relationships and Application. This workshop will lead participants through one module to explore their learning preferences and discuss, reflect and question how these impact relationships with co-workers and family. We will also discuss the implementation of the AURORA program in the Yukon and it's success in creating inclusive and supportive workplaces.

3:00 pm - 3:15 pm
Networking Break
3:15 pm - 4:30 pm
Annual General Meeting
5:30 pm - 7:30 pm
English Pub Night

Thursday, June 4th

9:00 am - 10:30 am
Breakout Sessions
Mobilizing and inspiring collaborative employment action
Speakers: Dan Collins , Jack Styan , Shelley Gerber

Hundreds of millions of dollars have been spent to advance employment for people with disabilities in Canada, yet progress for people with developmental disabilities, as evidenced by employment rates, has been incremental.  A group of people in BC, representing key stakeholders in government and community, wanted to try a different approach to this enduring and complex issue.  The Community Action Employment Plan, which has completed two years of implementation, is the result of their work.
 
The Plan was released in March 2013 and incorporates the knowledge and experience of service providers, self advocates, family members, Community Living BC (CLBC) staff &other community members.  The Plan guides the work and collaboration towards meeting the vision of B.C. having the highest rate of participation in employment among people with developmental disabilities in North America.participants will learn about how the Plan was developed, the key elements,as well as its progress & challenges

Autism and Employment: Uncover the Hidden Possibilities
Speakers: Jamie Suderman, Rachelle Chartier

Participants will get an overview of Autism Spectrum Disorder. We will then go into detail regarding autism specific barriers and more importantly their strengths in employment. We will present on Autism Resource Centre specific services to assisting job seekers in finding employment. We will introduce workshop participants to our vocational assessment and how it assists us in helping our job seekers find employment. Lastly we will discuss autism specific workplace supports and provide a few activities to sum up what we have talked about through the presentation and to allow participants the chance to show what they have learned.

The Big Blue Wig of Diversity
Speakers: Sean Wiltshire

A 90 minute presentation on engagement of employers in diversity & innovation strategies. Teaching people how to educate the business community on why & how diversity works. Referencing demographic date and labour force changes.

InclusionWorks! Using Family-Governance to Increase Youth Employment
Speakers: Adam Cornett, Arlene Zuckernick , Asher Johnson-Dorma , Catriona Johnson, Meliah Motchman , Paula Shaw

This presentation will introduce the service model of collective family-governance and explore the ways in which family-governed groups can utilize government and other funding to create employment-focused programming and supports. In BC and other places, collective family governance is emerging as an alternative to traditional service-delivery models, including agency-driven employment services. A model that pools individualized funds (government, personal, etc.) and that combines the knowledge, experience, networks, and ideas of a small group of self-advocates, family members and support workers, family governance puts into action the goals of those who are the greatest stakeholders in finding and maintaining employment self-advocates and their families. This workshop will highlight the InclusionWorks! model of family governance and its successful support of transitioning youth to meaningful employment in partnership with the Work BC program ending with a discussion about this.

10:30 am - 11:00 am
Networking Break
11:00 am - 12:30 pm
Breakout Sessions
Double Session: Employment Support Specialty Advanced Certificate Program / Sharing Positive Experiences with Inclusive Employment
Speakers: Chris Arnold, Jon Corbett, Meaghan Feduck, Rachelle Hole , Shawn de Raaf

This 90 minute session is comprised of two 45 minute presentations.

Session One

Employment Support Specialty Advanced Certificate Program 

In this presentation Chris and Meaghan will go through the development and delivery of Canada's first completely online Advanced Certificate Program, the Employment Supports Specialty (ESS).  
 
We will profile the wide range of students who have benefitted from this program and look at how the program concepts are learned and applied through a variety of activities and presentation modes.  Hear what the students had to say and see how this program helped benefit those they support. See examples of training content.

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Session Two

Learn about a new online mapping tool that is enabling individuals with developmental disabilities (self-advocated), their families, service providers, and employers to share and learn about inclusive employment experiences. The objectives of the project are to learn:
 
1.What factors contribute to inclusive employment for individuals with developmental disabilities in BC.
 
2.How service providers are able to support individuals with developmental disabilities in finding and keeping employment that is paid, positive and inclusive.
 
3.How employers can create an accessible and inclusive work place for individuals with developmental disabilities.

Double Session: Promoting Our Abilities: A BC Self-Advocate Mentoring and Training Network / The Hidden Rules: What Self-Advocates Need to Know About Getting and Keeping a Job
Speakers: Conrad Tyrkin, Jessica Humphrey, Sheenagh Morrison , Shelley DeCoste, Sherwin Strong

This 90 minute session is comprised of two 45 minute presentations. 

Session One

Self Advocacy is a rights movement led by people who have been labelled as having a developmental disability.  This workshop will highlight the leadership of self advocates across BC working with government and community to build a network of mentors and trainers presently raising awareness of the supported employment principles and promoting the abilities of job seekers with diverse abilities. Three self advocates will share examples, through video, power-point and story telling, of how their mentorship is not only changing attitudes of their peers, support staff and employers, but actually getting people jobs! They will share mentoring tools and strategies with participants and facilitate a conversation about the importance of enabling independence and self-determination when supporting people to in find work.  Participants will leave the session with examples of how to support individuals with diverse abilities to take on mentorship and trainer roles as a way to increase employment


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Session Two

Description to follow.



Rotary at Work: Business with Heart
Speakers: Ajay Caleb

1. Participants will first be introduced to the Rotary at Work concept, and share a few success stories.
 
2. Participants will determine how Real Value is defined to a business
 
3. Participants will be given a scenario where they have to deliver value to a business (timed team exercise)
 
4. Participants will develop a methodology (plan) of connecting clients (job-seekers) with (potential) employers, and will share their results with the group. (timed team exercise)
 
5. Participants with deliver their plan to a business panel, and have it evaluated. (something like Dragons Den)

Mobilizing and inspiring collaborative employment action - Continued
Speakers: Dan Collins , Jack Styan , Shelley Gerber

Hundreds of millions of dollars have been spent to advance employment for people with disabilities in Canada, yet progress for people with developmental disabilities, as evidenced by employment rates, has been incremental.  A group of people in BC, representing key stakeholders in government and community, wanted to try a different approach to this enduring and complex issue.  The Community Action Employment Plan, which has completed two years of implementation, is the result of their work.
 
The Plan was released in March 2013 and incorporates the knowledge and experience of service providers, self advocates, family members, Community Living BC (CLBC) staff &other community members.  The Plan guides the work and collaboration towards meeting the vision of B.C. having the highest rate of participation in employment among people with developmental disabilities in North America.participants will learn about how the Plan was developed, the key elements,as well as its progress & challenges

12:30 pm - 2:00 pm
Lunch & Closing Keynote - Ryan Johnson